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Rapid Diver used for First Responders Fire/Rescue

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Rapid Diver used for First Responders Fire/Rescue

Post by Rapid Diver on Sun May 24, 2009 6:13 pm

This topic is to discuss how the Rapid Diver packs are being used with rescue professionals. Where is your Dept. and how are you are you storing and utilizing your Rapid Diver packs.

To start the topic...here are a few clips that support the need for the increasing need for water rescue.


Good Samaritan performs rescue


Law Enforcement and Fire Rescue respond to a tough situation



Last edited by Admin on Tue Jan 12, 2010 11:29 am; edited 13 times in total (Reason for editing : spelling)

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How do you store your Rapids?

Post by Rapid Diver on Wed May 27, 2009 10:35 am

Here are some examples of Rapids stored on the First Ons.





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Re: Rapid Diver used for First Responders Fire/Rescue

Post by firediver65 on Wed May 27, 2009 4:28 pm

I work for Golden Gate Fire and we have 2 packs each on all 4 of our front line trucks. We use the packs for rescue not for recovery, that is a job for law enforcement. Most of the bodies of water that we go into are canals that are under 20 feet deep.
The rapid diver packs are great for fast in the water rescues, we can have a diver ready to go in the water in minutes with a back-up diver on the bank in case the primary diver has trouble.
The rapid diver is the best was to go for water rescues for first responders.

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Rural Iowa Volunteer Fire Dept

Post by MPFDDIVER153 on Wed May 27, 2009 6:29 pm

I am an officer on a local volunteer fire department made up of 26 members and 13 pieces of apparatus. We cover both the city and the majority of the county. Our city has a population of approx. 8500 people and approx. 25000 in the county. We cover 185 sq. miles with numerous ponds, streams and a river. I am one of two divers on the dept. Time is crucial when you have to cover so much area. Another issue we have is in the winter with the ice fishing. I don't know how many of you have been under ice but, it is such a different feeling. I have been wanting to get a Rapid Diver System for a long time. I have one now. Thanks Chris!

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Great product

Post by im22sniper on Fri May 29, 2009 10:54 am

I received two packs from Chris to replace two older quick dive packs. These units Chris delivered are far superior to anything else out there for quick rescue packs. We have the two units on our squad unit. The squad is a three man crew in an Excursion. They are used for quick response to fires, medical back up calls and special responses like drownings. They can arrive very quickly and now with this product be dressed and ready for immediate deployment. Here in Central Florida the chance of a drowning or vehicle in a lake is a fairly common occurance. Thank you Chris for great product.

Ray Thompson
Dist. Chief
Apopka FD

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FD 1 Dives into Water Rescues

Post by Rapid Diver on Tue Jun 30, 2009 4:05 pm

FD 1 dives into water rescues



By Anne Lautzenheiser
St. Tammany News
There was a rather unusual group of swimmers hitting the pool at Cross Gates Athletic Club in Slidell this week.

Along with the sunbathers and toddlers splashing in the fountains, several members of St. Tammany Fire District 1 were donning scuba gear and jumping into the water. The group was in its first day of training with the Zeagle Rapid Diver system, a compact set of scuba equipment for aiding in underwater rescues.

According to FD1 Capt. Pat McCloskey, the department has considered the idea of acquiring rescue diving gear for quite some time. Recent drowning deaths spurred the agency into action.

“We are surrounded by water in this area, so we’ve wanted to do this for several years, but we didn’t quite know how to go about it,” said McCloskey. “Then in the last year, there was one drowning near Eden Isles, and two in Eagle Lake, so we knew it was time to move on it.”

McCloskey contacted Rick Sutton, owner of Coral Reef Dive Shop. Sutton helped direct them to the Rapid Diver program, and then volunteered his time to lead the training.

A Master Scuba Dive Trainer since 1995, Sutton has logged over 2,000 dives. He has trained a number of members of the St. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s Office, and said the firefighters, some of whom were already certified divers, were “very comfortable” in the water.

“Their reaction was fantastic,” said Sutton. “A lot more people showed up for the training than we had planned, because they are really excited to do anything that’s going to help them save more lives.”

Sutton said that while the firefighters are already familiar with using compressed air in a self-contained breathing apparatus, which help provide breathable air when fighting fires. Using them underwater is a little more involved, however, and Sutton said they rose to the challenge.

The system includes a lightweight diving harness that can be slipped on in less than a minute, plus a small air canister suitable for a dive of about 15 to 20 minutes in water of moderate depth. It was initially developed for the military, who needed a versatile, easily deployed system for certain missions on the water.

Public safety agencies and first responders around the South, where waterways are more plentiful, began utilizing the system. It is reported to be especially useful in areas of low visibility or difficult shore entry.

Officials at FD1 estimate the equipment can save up to 30 minutes when beginning water rescues. About a dozen members of the department will take part in the initial training, and will be based at three specific engine companies: Eden Isles, Central in Olde Towne, and Brownswitch Road. After a two-week period of training at Cross Gates, the department will begin working with a stripped-down vehicle submerged in one of the local waterways.

According to Chief of Administration Chris Kaufmann, the idea is to supplement the sheriff’s office Marine Division Search and Rescue Team.

“We’re looking at it as a partnership, a way of adding to our commitment to saving lives and property,” said Kaufmann. “If someone is trapped underwater, this will allow us to get down there and do as much as possible until the sheriff’s office gets there.”

Sheriff Jack Strain said he wholly supports the endeavor.

“People don’t realize that drowning doesn’t just happen out on the lake; it can happen in a small pond in a subdivision,” said Strain. “Anytime our fire and police can get additional training to work together, it makes us stronger agencies and gives us a stronger community.”

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New Addition to the Rapid Diver Team

Post by SVFD5155 on Wed Jul 08, 2009 8:42 pm

Hey Everyone,
My name is Mark Warren and I was part of the original Research/Development Team back in its first days at Weeki Wachee Springs, FL. That got me started into rescue diving and my current career now as a firefighter. I will be working with Chris and the crew as the Fire/Rescue Diving Technical Advisor and the Tennessee Area Rep. If you have any questions for me, feel free to contact me about them. Take care and keep diving.

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From the Isles of Capri Fire Dept

Post by Rapid Diver on Fri Aug 14, 2009 9:21 am

I stopped by the Isles of Capri Fire Dept for an equipment demo. Here is a video of their boat operation....a great team and one heck of a location!


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FD Logo placement on the Rapid Diver system

Post by Rapid Diver on Fri Oct 02, 2009 3:54 pm

Here is a great place to put your logo...Special thanks to Ochopee FD!


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City gets $356,000 stimulus for new fire boat

Post by Rapid Diver on Wed Oct 14, 2009 11:34 am

In case you didn't see this...


City gets $356,000 stimulus for new fire boat

By Paul Leighton
Staff writer

BEVERLY — A good chunk of federal stimulus money has found its way to Beverly.

Mayor Bill Scanlon and fire Chief Richard Pierce announced yesterday that the city has been awarded $356,465 to buy a new fire boat through a U.S. Department of Homeland Security grant program designed to fight terrorism.

The boat will be used to protect not only the Beverly waterfront but communities from Cape Ann to Lynn and even Boston, Pierce said.

"Our intent was to make it a regional asset," he said.

The money has been awarded as part of the $150 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Port Security Grant program, which is designed to "protect critical port infrastructure from terrorism," according to the Department of Homeland Security.

Pierce said the Fire Department had applied twice before for grant money for the boat under different programs and had been turned down.

"I was shocked when it happened and with the amount," he said.

The grant will cover the entire cost of the boat so the city will not have to pay anything, according to Scanlon and Pierce.

The new boat will be about 30 feet long and equipped with all of the modern electronics and full water-pumping capability, Pierce said. It will replace the Fire Department's current boat, a 23-footer that is about two decades old.

Pierce said the new boat will be used to fight fires both on the water and on land along the waterfront. "It would be perfect for the Tuck's Point condos," he said.

The new boat will also be used for training purposes and by the department's dive team. Pierce said the current boat is small for the dive team and difficult to climb aboard from the water. The dive team might be able to use the faster new boat rather than waiting for the U.S. Coast Guard to pick them up by helicopter, he said.

The new boat will be docked at Beverly harbor and can be used to respond to emergencies in Beverly as well as neighboring coastal communities such as Salem, Gloucester, Marblehead, Manchester, Swampscott, Lynn and Nahant. Pierce said the boat could also respond to a "major event" in and around Boston.

Fire chiefs in those communities supported Beverly's grant application, Pierce said. He said some communities use smaller Boston Whalers as fire boats but do not have full-size fire boats.

Beverly was the only fire department in Massachusetts to be awarded money through the Port Security Grant program, according to Scanlon and Pierce. Pierce credited Deputy Chief Peter O'Connor with writing the grant application.

The city will solicit bids for the best deal for a boat and hopes to have it in the water by next summer.

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Rapid Diver specific Training for FD

Post by Rapid Diver on Sat Dec 12, 2009 7:55 am

We will be hosting some Rapid Diver specific training confernces with several dive teams this year. I will post a list of training dates and times on the Forum.

If you would like to shedule a training date, please email me at chris@RapidDiver.com

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The Rapid Diver and the Side Imaging are a perfect fit

Post by Admin on Sat Dec 12, 2009 12:40 pm

Check out this video of how a boat was found using the Side Imaging system:



Last edited by Admin on Sun Dec 20, 2009 11:23 am; edited 1 time in total

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RAPID RESCUE WATER TEAM SOG

Post by Admin on Mon Dec 14, 2009 11:09 am

Here is a SOG outline that you can draw from in for your own department Rapid Rescue (Rapid Diver system) SOG

STANDARD OPERATING GUIDELINES

Purpose

To provide a higher level of care to the residents and guests of the ______, the Fire Chief directed the development of the Rapid Rescue Water Team (RRWT). The RRWT will provide an emergence response at any time to any place within the _________. This includes, but is not limited to, canals, lakes, ponds and quarries. The team will assist in rescue operations outside of _________, if requested.

This Standard Operating Guideline (SOG) will be utilized by all team members and support staff for training and rescue operations. Every member of _____ is expected to know these guidelines.

Policy:
• No person shall engage in water rescue operations unless they currently are certified as a Public Safety Diver as outlined in this SOP.
• No personnel are permitted to operate at a level of certification above which they have been certified at any incident or training dive.
• Rescuers must be tested annually to region standards to maintain certification to act in the capacity of a rescuer.

Team Members

All team members of the RRWT are members of the _______ Department. Each team member selected contributes qualities, skills, knowledge and time to enhance the team’s performance. Every team member is a respected and integral part of the team.

With team members and surface support personnel we can deliver a high standard of proficiency during a water emergency.

Surface Support Personnel

Any ______ member may be included in surface support functions during a water rescue operation if he/she has the appropriate training. The personnel performing the surface support functions will be under the direction of the senior rescuer and or water division leader.





Team Member Certifications

All RRWT must be, at minimum, open water certified by an accredited organization (PADI, NAUI, Dive Rescue International). Team members have one (1) year from the time they are selected for the team to become certified. __________instructors will offer water certification classes to paid employees but employees attending this class will not receive overtime or cause overtime for shift work.

Team Qualifications

To join RRWT candidates must show that they can swim 200 yards continuous utilizing the free style, sidestroke or breaststroke and immediately after finishing the swim float for ten (10) minutes.


Team Coordinator

The team coordinator will be responsible for the immediate direction of all activities of the team including, but not limited to, scheduling, training, operations, budgeting and purchasing. This direction will be accomplished through written and oral orders, policy, directives and guidelines.
If at a water rescue emergency the team coordinator is not available, the senior team rescuer will be operations/ water division leader. The senior team rescuer is the team member with the most water rescue experience.

Training

Members of the RRWT will be required to attend bi-monthly training. Training will consist of basis swimming skills, knowledge of the equipment and basic SCUBA skills. During each training session there will be skills performed in zero visibility conditions. Training will take place in environments where water emergencies occur. The training will be on/off duty. Annually team members must be able to complete the waterman ship evaluation.

It is mandatory that team members attend a minimum of 75 percent of the off duty training offered. Team members may not miss two (2) consecutive training sessions. Failure to meet the two (2) above mentioned requirements will be cause for removal from the team unless a team member has medical leave or prior approval from team coordinator.

All ______personnel will receive, on duty, surface support training by members of the RRWT.

PARAMETERS FOR RAPID DIVER SYSTEM
There are parameters and stipulations for use of the Rapid Diver system. As with all buoyancy control devices there are always suggested maximum depths allowed. With the Rapid Diver system our (_______) maximum depth will be 20 feet. Also before entering water for a rescue the subject in question or vehicle must be visible by eyesight. A backup rescuer will be dressed and ready to enter the water before primary rescuer enters the water.

Equipment

All of the rescue equipment will be maintained following the suggested maintenance requirements by the manufacturer. All equipment will be maintained on an annual basis by a certified repair facility.

Decision Making

There are two primary considerations prior to making a water rescue. The first is safety and the second is risk/benefit. These two considerations will be assessed on a continual basis during a rescue operation. This decision will be made be the operations/water division leader.

Safety is paramount to the rescue operation. It is everyone’s responsibility to perform in a safe manor and to be alert for the safety of all team members. Any safety issue must be immediately addressed. All team members are responsible for safety.

Risk/benefit is used to determine the go/no go mode. If hazards are present that present immediate harm a rescuer, the operation will stop and an alternate action plan will be utilized.

Witnesses. Interview all possible witnesses. Children can make good witnesses because they are often not as emotionally involved as adults. Obtain the parent’s permission when possible.


Rescue vs. Recovery

The golden hour will be used to determine the rescue vs. recovery mode. Usually cold weather may extend the golden hour limit. Time will be of the essence during the rescue realizing every moment counts. The ______RRWT will only be utilized for the rescue mode. There will be no rescue for a reported lost person or at scenes where there is no last seen point. The _____________dive team will be utilized for the recovery mode.


Pre-water checklist

Equipment check
Air system on
Air full on
Check pressure gauge before and after dive
Check regulator operation
Dive light and light secure
Mask and snorkel on
One knife high (on chest area) one knife on lower leg
Rescuer be tethered (on safety rope)
Each operational rescuer must be asked and respond “go” or “no go” to his/her physical, mental capabilities, equipment, and dive plan.

Operations

Upon arrival at a water rescue emergency the following will be a guideline of procedures to follow:
While rescuers are suiting up, primary rescuer and safety rescuer, the water division leader and or incident commander should establish the location of the victim.

Discuss with the rescuers prior to entry:
Approximate depth
Current
Underwater visibility
Water temperature
Known hazards
Entry / exit point
Information on victim(s)
Review line signals
Rescuer to line tender
1 pull = okay
2 pulls = more line
3 pulls = object found
4 pulls = emergency, deploy the safety diver

Line tender to rescuer
1 pull = okay
2 pulls = change direction
3 pulls = stop and come to the surface
4 pulls = emergency, stop and remain on the bottom


Rescuer should have all gear on and adjusted prior to entering the water.

Line tender will perform a safety check on the rescuer before entry into the water. A safety check will include telling the water division leader the air pressure of scuba bottle, air on, all lights working and completing a check of the rescuers equipment. Line tender will inform the water division leader the time, for rescuer, in and out of the water.

The line tender, and personnel working around the water will wear a personal floatation device.

All non-essential personnel will be out of the operation area.

The safety rescuer will be at the waters edge whenever the primary rescuer is in the water. The safety rescuer will have a safety line attached and ready to enter the water if needed.

Prior to going in-service from a rescue operation, everyone involved should be included in a post-incident discussion. At that time, it will be determined if a defusing is needed.

A medical Unit (for rescue personnel) will be on scene for all rescue operation.

When a line tended operation is used the rescuer must be attached with a quick release line tether mechanism.

A tow truck operator will be immediately dispatched to the scene.

Anytime a diver becomes entangled or entrapped during a dive, the safety diver shall be deployed immediately to mitigate and free the diver, and to provide the Operations Officer information on the safety of future dives.

Night Rescue Operations

Night water rescues are prohibited in hazardous environments or conditions. Use extreme caution in moving water or areas around low head dams.
All rescuers will securely attach a cylume stick to the regulator of their scuba tank. All rescuers will enter the water with a primary light.


Submerged Vehicle

In the event that there is a submerged vehicle, the rescuer will observe, the condition of the vehicle’s doors and windows. If the windows and doors are open, the rescuer should sweep the area for a victim. When approaching vehicle, check for stability. Due to entanglement risks, the rescuer will not penetrate the vehicle but shall do a hand sweep search up to an arm’s length inside the vehicle. It is not advised to enter the submerged vehicle.

Media Relations

If handled correctly it can be one of the team’s greatest allies in public relations. The Public Information Officer will be called out to be the designated spokesman for the RRWT. The PIO will keep the media as informed as circumstances and policy permit. PIO will keep the media within an area outside of the operation area taking place.

Return to Service

All equipment shall be cleaned and/or decontaminated, dried, inspected, and properly returned to its compartment or storage container prior to the apparatus returning to service.

Family and friends of drowned victims

Assisting the family and friends of a drowned victim may be the most difficult part of the operation. There is a strong mix grief and frustration when a victim’s family and friends are waiting to hear the inevitable. Theses people should be treated as secondary victims.
Do not avoid contact with these people. If possible have a team member stay with them to explain the operation and provide emotional support.
Team members must be extremely sensitive to the emotions of the victim’s family and friends. Each team member must act and speak professionally at all times.
The PIO should contact the crisis incident manager from CCSO.


Remember:
Risk/Benefit

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SCAN/MARK/DIVE

Post by Rapid Diver on Sat Dec 19, 2009 7:23 am

SCAN/MARK/DIVE Training is now available! PM or email chris@RapidDiver.com for more information.


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Rapid Diver system Maintenance and Inspection program

Post by Admin on Sun Dec 20, 2009 11:23 am

A Rapid Diver system Maintenance and Inspection program is available for annual maintenance and inspection of your dept's Rapid Diver systems.

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Menomonie Water Rescue Efforts Go High-Tech

Post by Admin on Tue Dec 22, 2009 9:32 am

Menomonie Water Rescue Efforts Go High-Tech

Wisconsin - A high-tech fish locator has become part of the Menomonie Fire Department's arsenal of equipment to rescue people in water or retrieve drowning victims. The Humminbird Side Imaging Sonar unit, which has been mounted on the department's rescue boat, is capable of scanning a 720-foot-wide swath of water at any depth with a single pass of the boat. It has a nearly 11-inch screen showing in great detail anything sonar waves come into contact with.

"This will allow us to investigate a much larger area in a shorter amount of time," said Battalion Chief Denny Klass. "The unit gives much more detailed information of what's under the boat than a typical fish locator. It's like sucking all the water out of the lake and taking aerial digital photos of what's left."

View the full story here at: www.firefightingnews.com

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LONG BEACH Fire Rescue assist with Travis Pastrana World Record jump

Post by Admin on Sat Dec 26, 2009 8:24 am

Don Johnson and the rescue crew at the Long Beach Fire Dept deploy the Rapid's during Travis Pastrana's historic World Record Jump.


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Distinguished Public Service Award for Firefighter

Post by Rapid Diver on Fri Feb 26, 2010 1:26 pm

Acting Lieutenant Jesus Padilla was recently honored and awarded the 2009 Distinguished Public Service for Firefighter on October 21, 2009, by The Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce at an awards breakfast banquet held at the Naples Hilton. Jesus Padilla was nominated by his department and was selected to receive the award.





Padilla was cited for valiant efforts as a diver to rescue the last of four persons in a car submerged in a lake with zero visibility. Although the victim he rescued survived only two days, Golden Gate Fire Chief Bob Metzger said of Padilla,"He faced and overcame profound challenges in locating the vehicle, establishing its orientation and making the risky decision to enter it to try to save a life."

Jesus Padilla was hired as a firefighter for The Golden Gate Fire Control & Rescue District
on March 10, 2003. He was promoted as Driver/Engineer on February 26, 2005, and
on to Acting Lieutenant on September 13, 2008.

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110 vehicles found in Canal

Post by Rapid Diver on Sat Feb 27, 2010 4:53 pm

This is a good reason to employ a Side Imaging System

From: Palm Beach Post


Search Of Canal Yields Skeleton, 110 Sunken Cars

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- A set of bones and 110 cars were found submerged in a canal in a rural area west of Boca Raton, authorities said.

Police told WPBF News 25 that divers were searching a few miles of the Hillsboro Canal along Loxahatchee River Road west of Highway 441 for stolen and abandoned cars around 11 a.m. Tuesday when they came across a silver Mercedes coupe containing what appeared to be human bones scattered across the driver and front passenger seats.

Detective Michael Bianchi with the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office told WPBF that the bones appear to have been in the vehicle for a long time.

"We're talking years," Bianchi said.

Bianchi said the car, which he thought to be a mid-1980s Mercedes 380 SEL or 450 SL, had a smashed hood and cracked front and back windshields. Investigators have not confirmed that the remains are from a human because, as Bianchi said, alligators are known in the past to store the carcasses of deer and other animals in sunken vehicles for later.

Bianchi told WPBF that the medical examiner's office will look at the remains to determine if they are human.

"I'm just hoping that it is not a human being in there. I'm hoping that it is just maybe an insurance job where someone dumped a car, or a stolen recovery and what we have is a set of animal remains, because it would be bad if we had to go announce to someone that a loved-one is dead or whatever the case may be," he said.

Bianchi said that the 45-mile long Hillsboro Canal is a popular dumping spot for stolen vehicles. He told WPBF that police divers using sonar equipment in a search along a few miles of the canal located 110 submerged cars Tuesday and that 27 of them had been pulled from the water by mid-afternoon.

According to the South Florida Water Management District, the canal ranges in depth from about 8 feet to 22 feet deep.

Bianchi said the case is still under investigation.

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Firefighters under investigation in Fla. crash

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 11, 2010 4:25 pm

Firefighters under investigation in Fla. crash
March 10, 2010

From: http://www.firerescue1.com/fire-ems/articles/769311-Firefighters-under-investigation-in-Fla-crash/


As many as 10 Palm Beach County Fire Rescue workers are under investigation in the aftermath of the accident

By Jose Lamiet
Palm Beach Post

WELLINGTON, Fla. — The first responders to the fatal car crash involving International Polo Club founder John Goodman are under investigation because the body of 23-year-old Scott Wilson was not found until an hour after the accident.

As many as 10 Palm Beach County Fire Rescue workers are under investigation in the aftermath of the Feb. 12 accident, when Goodman ran a stop sign and slammed Wilson's car into a canal.

Two firefighters searched Wilson's submerged vehicle, which was upside down in the water, but they could not find anyone in the early morning darkness, sources told The Palm Beach Post on Monday.

In time, the fire rescue responders from Wellington's Station 27 left the scene because they believed their job was done. Sheriff's deputies were at the scene when Wilson's Hyundai Sonata was hoisted back on the road, revealing his body in the driver's seat.

"Our guys obviously didn't look for a body hard enough,'' said a fire rescue source.

Capt. Don Delucia, fire rescue's spokesman, confirmed the existence of the investigation but declined further comment. When asked about emergency procedures for cars in canals, Delucia said: "There are masks and snorkels on the emergency vehicles but the conditions in our canals are bad. It's so opaque you can't see your hand in front of you, even in broad daylight. Diving on a vehicle is extremely dangerous and difficult."

Delucia said responders also have the option to call in professional divers, but that wasn't done, according to a source.

An autopsy showed that Wilson drowned after Goodman drove his Bentley through a stop sign and hit his car, sending it into the water off Lake Worth Road in Wellington. Goodman left the scene and walked to a nearby home to call 911. Authorities are still trying to figure out whether alcohol or drugs were involved.

Goodman, 46, has hired star attorney Roy Black and has been staying in Miami Beach hotels since the crash. He has not been charged.

Meanwhile, the No. 2 man at the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office, Col. Mike Gauger, is conducting an informal review of sheriff's deputies' response. He declined to comment on the review.

Wilson, a Wellington High graduate who earned his engineering degree from the University of Central Florida in May, was headed home for his sister's birthday.

Reached Monday, William Wilson, Scott's father, said, "I haven't been told anything by the sheriff's office or anyone, so I can't really comment."

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Miami Dade Trains with the Rapid Diver System

Post by Rapid Diver on Tue Mar 16, 2010 10:32 am

Miami-Dade which is the largest PSD dive team in the world (600 divers) uses the Rapid Diver System:







Last edited by Rapid Diver on Thu Apr 22, 2010 7:53 am; edited 1 time in total

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Red Bull Air Race Rapid Response Dive Rescue Team in Abu Dhabi

Post by Rapid Diver on Mon Apr 05, 2010 4:41 pm

Here are pictures from the Red Bull Air Race in Abu Dhabi







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Rapid to the Rescue in Red Bull Air Race

Post by Rapid Diver on Sun Apr 18, 2010 4:26 pm

Rapid Divers were used in the successful rescue at the Perth Red Bull Air Race







First Red Bull Air Racer Crash
from: http://jalopnik.com/5518815/first-red-bull-air-racer-crash

The Red Bull Air Race just suffered the first crash in its seven year history. Brazilian pilot Adilson Kindlemann survives plummeting tail first into Perth's Swan River after his engine stalled in the middle of a chicane.

The Red Bull Air Race is an international series of races that typically take place over water near major cities. Specially built race planes navigate tight turns around pylons and other obstacles specifically erected for the event. The Air Race will come to New York for the first time this June, flying over the Hudson River between Manhattan and Jersey City.
Kindlemann was knocked unconscious during the accident and would have drowned if it wasn't for the Air Race's crack emergency response team, which had divers in the water with the crashed plane in under a minute. Kindlemann only suffered whiplash injuries in the crash


Last edited by Rapid Diver on Thu Apr 22, 2010 7:57 am; edited 1 time in total

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Rapid Diver and PWC's: A serious tool

Post by Rapid Diver on Thu Apr 22, 2010 7:31 am

How do you rescue a downed pilot in 30 seconds even though even though the crash site is hundreds of meters away? Use a high speed PWC!

Here are some pictures from the Cocoa Beach Rescue Team:






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Re: Rapid Diver used for First Responders Fire/Rescue

Post by Spd 135 on Mon Apr 26, 2010 4:04 pm

Rapid Diver wrote:FD 1 dives into water rescues



By Anne Lautzenheiser
St. Tammany News
There was a rather unusual group of swimmers hitting the pool at Cross Gates Athletic Club in Slidell this week.

Along with the sunbathers and toddlers splashing in the fountains, several members of St. Tammany Fire District 1 were donning scuba gear and jumping into the water. The group was in its first day of training with the Zeagle Rapid Diver system, a compact set of scuba equipment for aiding in underwater rescues.

According to FD1 Capt. Pat McCloskey, the department has considered the idea of acquiring rescue diving gear for quite some time. Recent drowning deaths spurred the agency into action.

“We are surrounded by water in this area, so we’ve wanted to do this for several years, but we didn’t quite know how to go about it,” said McCloskey. “Then in the last year, there was one drowning near Eden Isles, and two in Eagle Lake, so we knew it was time to move on it.”

McCloskey contacted Rick Sutton, owner of Coral Reef Dive Shop. Sutton helped direct them to the Rapid Diver program, and then volunteered his time to lead the training.

A Master Scuba Dive Trainer since 1995, Sutton has logged over 2,000 dives. He has trained a number of members of the St. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s Office, and said the firefighters, some of whom were already certified divers, were “very comfortable” in the water.

“Their reaction was fantastic,” said Sutton. “A lot more people showed up for the training than we had planned, because they are really excited to do anything that’s going to help them save more lives.”

Sutton said that while the firefighters are already familiar with using compressed air in a self-contained breathing apparatus, which help provide breathable air when fighting fires. Using them underwater is a little more involved, however, and Sutton said they rose to the challenge.

The system includes a lightweight diving harness that can be slipped on in less than a minute, plus a small air canister suitable for a dive of about 15 to 20 minutes in water of moderate depth. It was initially developed for the military, who needed a versatile, easily deployed system for certain missions on the water.

Public safety agencies and first responders around the South, where waterways are more plentiful, began utilizing the system. It is reported to be especially useful in areas of low visibility or difficult shore entry.

Officials at FD1 estimate the equipment can save up to 30 minutes when beginning water rescues. About a dozen members of the department will take part in the initial training, and will be based at three specific engine companies: Eden Isles, Central in Olde Towne, and Brownswitch Road. After a two-week period of training at Cross Gates, the department will begin working with a stripped-down vehicle submerged in one of the local waterways.

According to Chief of Administration Chris Kaufmann, the idea is to supplement the sheriff’s office Marine Division Search and Rescue Team.

“We’re looking at it as a partnership, a way of adding to our commitment to saving lives and property,” said Kaufmann. “If someone is trapped underwater, this will allow us to get down there and do as much as possible until the sheriff’s office gets there.”

Sheriff Jack Strain said he wholly supports the endeavor.

“People don’t realize that drowning doesn’t just happen out on the lake; it can happen in a small pond in a subdivision,” said Strain. “Anytime our fire and police can get additional training to work together, it makes us stronger agencies and gives us a stronger community.”

I am the instructor of the Open water / practical portion of this, training, and we have completed 2 classes last year with great reults. I have put together a training syllabus for this portion for all of our firefighters to take part in. I have broken this down to a 4 member response with a second crew for victim extraction. In this case it is only for immediate response and not a search and recovery class. Even though it may be a recovery, it will be due to the patient expiring during or soon after submersion.

Over the years I have watched police and fire personnel jump into the water and hold their breath. I have been a police officer since 1991. Our perspective is to give the rescuers a breathing medium to keep the rescuers safe. They use SCBA so this is not much of a transition, even though we thought it may be. We were pleasantly surprised. It also allows the fire personnel to see who is comfortable in what role and to know what each role does having trained in it.

We do not require scuba certification, but it is suggested. This is not a dive course, but instead a rescue course with the rescuer bringing a breathing medium to a hostile environment. There is no concern for trim, bouyancy, etc. It is about keeping the rescuers safe so they can go home to their familiies and some day retire. As public safety personnel we see this stuff on a regular basis, but the victim, or citizen rescuer, only sees it once in a life time. We also know that, unless there are divers on hand such as events, it is more often a recovery than a rescue. The need to put rescuers in harms way is just stupid. Besides, as I said before..............these guys are going in regardless. It is what they do. These folk go into burning buildings, haz-mat siutations and I think it is a little bold to suggest they can't master this equipment for the specific use intended, without a scuba diver certification. They receive the proper pool work from Rick and then I take them to the practicals. There are about 40 guys trained with more coming.

The training also fits right in with the command control structure they are already using. There is a rigid push during class and training that this is just a means to breath while you do what you do everyday. Each person initials and signs that they understand this is only for immediate and quick rescue situation and violating this will be a direct violation of training standards. This has worked well and keeps the rescuer safe while allowing them to provide an immediate response. I have attached some links to the training sessions from my facebook. Mark

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=1481225461#!/album.php?aid=2041335&id=1481225461
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=1481225461#!/album.php?aid=2041397&id=1481225461
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Rapid Diver Training in Palm Beach

Post by Rapid Diver on Mon May 17, 2010 6:56 am

If you are interested in doing some dives with your Rapid, or would like to try a Rapid Diver we will be hosting a dive each month at the Phil Foster Park (under the Blue Heron Bridge).

The water is crystal clear and warm, and we dive at slack tide. PM me if you are interested in joining us!

Here is a picture:


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Rapid used to raise speed boat in lake Pontchartrain

Post by Rapid Diver on Sat Jun 12, 2010 3:43 pm

Mark sent in these pictures. If you are looking for Rapid Diver training in the Slidell, La area you can contact Mark and Rick at 985-641-9888





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Rapid Diver deployed in Homeland Security disaster training

Post by Rapid Diver on Tue Aug 31, 2010 11:56 am

Rapid Diver has set the bar once again for rapid response diving this time during a recent Homeland Security scenerio training evolution...read on:




Engineer Jake Beckman of the Golden Gate Fire Department climbs back aboard a Collier County Sheriff's Office boat during an emergency training exercise in the Gulf in coordination with Collier EMS and local fire districts on June 9, 2010. The crew responded to a scenario in which an aircraft from Naples Airport crashed five miles off-shore of the Naples Pier. During the exercise, Divers located crash victims and the plane's black box. Greg Kahn/Staff

From: http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2010/jun/09/diving-dummies-emergency-responders-multiple-agenc/

NAPLES — Some gulf fish swimming five miles out from Naples Pier may have come across a confusing scene on Wednesday.
There, underwater, a plastic dummy lay on the gulf floor near two black boxes, while about a dozen scuba divers spread out searching for them.
This was the scene of a unique training exercise, bringing together multiple emergency response agencies in Collier County to test their ability to respond to a small plane crash in the gulf.
Boats and dive teams from Collier County Sheriff’s Office, City of Naples Police and Fire department, and fire districts from North Naples, East Naples, Isles of Capri and Golden Gate were called out into the gulf for the marine search and rescue exercise.
Once they reached the site of the fake crash, divers plunged into the gulf, in search of bodies and debris.
The functional exercise was called Operation Fathom – though it could have just as easily been called “Diving for Dummies.”
But Joe Frazier, the county’s Homeland Security coordinator, said the training scenario was serious business.
“It’s designed to determine how well our (departments) respond to a downed aircraft in the gulf,” Frazier said.
Similar events have played out in real life in Collier County.
Collier Sheriff’s diver Jim Baker recalls a downed single-occupant aircraft off the Naples coast about seven years ago. There were no survivors, he said, but he had to search the aircraft for evidence.
Frazier said a key to this drill was testing the coordination between multiple agencies that had recently formed the Marine Emergency Response Community (MERC) to work out any kinks.
“It’s really a plan or procedure that combines all the marine aspects in the county,” said Mike Swanson, a deputy chief at North Naples and MERC coordinator.
Swanson said that it’s useful for these agencies to work together because marine equipment used in emergency response is limited in the county.
The drills allow all of the participants to play out their role in a given scenario, he said.
On shore, representative of the departments gathered in a mobile command center — a large bus with radios and computers — to practice communication of the coordinates of the crash.
One of the conclusions that came from the drill was the need to have multiple radio channels for communication in large-scale emergencies, said Swanson.
The more complicated the situation, the more difficult communication becomes, he said.
In this case, there was too much information to be relayed to too many sources for just one channel.
The most promising conclusion the drill provided was the expertise of the diving teams in their various roles, Frazier observed.
For most divers participating in the drill, searching for dummies and debris is nothing new – though the partnership between fire districts and the sheriff’s office was different.
However, divers from Golden Gate got the opportunity to experience something they rarely do in their own district – salt water.
Divers from the landlocked district typically do search and rescue in murky canals and lakes — the kind that most people won’t even fish in — said Bill Moyer, a Golden Gate battalion chief.
The 15 feet of visibility was welcomed by Golden Gate Fire Lt. Jason Sellers and Engineer Jake Beckman, who typically can’t see what’s in front of them when they dive. They were able to spot the dummy in minutes.
Climbing back onto the boat from the clear water, Sellers quipped, “We definitely need some salt water in our district.”

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New equipment may help save lives on lake

Post by Rapid Diver on Sun Oct 03, 2010 8:44 am

New equipment may help save lives on lake



Deputy Tony Guy tries on the recently donated Rapid Response Unit that will be used by Constable 1 M


Recent donations by a local foundation and the Seven Coves Marina Association have bolstered the Precinct 1 Constable's Office Marine Division's volunteer dive team's ability to do their job. On June 28, the latest piece of equipment donated, a rapid response ventilator unit, may shift the focus in drowning cases from recovery to rescue.

Our goal for the equipment is rescue, not recovery," said Lt. Bryan Dubose, head of the marine division.

On Memorial Day, a boat near the FM 1097 bridge on Lake Conroe capsized when a sudden storm whipped up three to four-foot swells, dumping four occupants overboard. Within minutes, Deputy Tony Guy and his crew maneuvered a 6,000 pound boat in the dark with high currents and waves and plucked three of the four boaters safely from the water. The fourth victim drowned in the accident.
On Memorial Day weekend, we received a call that there was a capsized vessel with four in the water," Guy said. When we pulled up on the scene, we could hear screaming and we saw the vessel capsized. We got three people out of the water and Texas Parks and Wildlife recovered the fourth. We immediately took them to shore, where ambulances were waiting."

This is the fifth life-saving incident that Guy has been involved in, including one incident where a man was rescued twice from the under FM 1097 bridge. Guy was recognized as Montgomery County employee of the month on June 28. Guy is part of a seven-member team at the Precinct 1 Constable's Office Marine Division that operates on Lake Conroe.

In addition to enforcing boating rules and regulations, the division assists with rescues of swimmers and boaters and recovers victims and evidence. The division has six boats on Lake Conroe and two jet skis. We are alone patrolling the 29,000 acre body of water," Dubose said. People don't realize how dangerous the lake can get."

In 1993, a volunteer dive team was established in the county to search lakes, ponds, rivers and waterways for drowning victims or evidence.
Since that time, up to 15 certified divers have donate time to the team and worked cases all over Texas because of the technology and expertise developed here. The team has assisted on Lake Livingston, in Corpus Christi, and in Kemah to name a few and was even asked to participate in the Natalee Holloway case, an Alabama teenager who disappeared in 2005 in Aruba. Because the team is all volunteer, officers could not afford the time or money to go. We do a lot of mutual aid," said Vernon Miller, civilian dive team leader and dive master. We get called out two to three times a month."

The new equipment will be stored on marine division boats, which respond to reports of drowning on Lake Conroe. If the boats can retrieve the victim within the golden window" of about 10 to 15 minutes, they may be saved. It we can suit up quickly and hit the water, it could be a rescue instead of a recovery," Miller said.

The rapid response gear, which looks like a black safety vest with an air canister attached, is the latest donation from the Community, Help, Assistance and Support for Emergency Rescue and Recovery Foundation, or CHASER. It is a nonprofit organization that provides support and services to First Responders of Montgomery County for water search and rescue missions.

The group was founded by relatives and friends of a college student who drowned on the Richland Chambers Reservoir near Corsicana on Dec. 13, 2008. Chase Bergfeld of Conroe, a student at Texas A&M, was returning from dinner on the lake when the boat hit a stump and sank. While Bergfeld provide life vests to his female companions on the boat, he was pushing the capsized vessel when he was overcome by hyperthermia. While many warned the family that it could be weeks before the body would be found, the family brought in EquiSearch, Silvetti commercial divers and the Montgomery County Dive Team to recover their son. His body was found six days after the accident.
A day after Chase Bergfeld was found, the team went to Dallas to search for the body of a little boy who had been missing 35 days. That body was also recovered.

The dive team is also called on to retrieve evidence from waterways, including stolen cars and weapons. They were able to get a gun used in a homicide and a stolen car from a carjacking in Montgomery County. Over the years, the team has developed technology to aid in the search of lake. Using a side scan sonor, a device to detect fish and bottoms for fishing, a member of the unit attached it to a tow fish to provide a better view in deep waters. The device can detect possible victims or evidence in 30 feet of water, Miller said.

Last year, we pulled more cars out than people," said Dubose.


Lake Conroe Marine Division
The Precinct 1 Constable's Office Marine Division offers a marine division on Lake Conroe, which includes a volunteer dive team for rescue and recovery of victims and evidence on waterways throughout the county. Following are key features of the marine division and dive unit.
Marine Division
Seven deputies
Six boats
Two jet skis
Volunteer Dive Team
15 certified divers
Has worked throughout Texas, including Lake Livingston, Kemah and Corpus Christi

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2 fire captains disciplined in Fl victim search

Post by Rapid Diver on Fri Nov 05, 2010 5:48 pm

2 fire captains disciplined in Fla. victim search

None of the nine Fire Rescue employees on scene found the victim's body in a partially submerged car
By Jose Lambiet

http://www.firerescue1.com/search-rescue/articles/904839-2-fire-captains-disciplined-in-Fla-victim-search/

The Palm Beach Post

PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla. — Two Palm Beach County Fire Rescue captains were disciplined this month for their performance on the scene of the Feb. 12 car crash in rural Wellington that cost the life of 23-year-old Scott Wilson and could send polo mogul John Goodman to prison.
Captains Anthony Cinilia and Scott Bielecky supervised the emergency response to the middle-of-the-night accident.
None of the nine Fire Rescue employees found the victim's body in the car, which was upside down and partly submerged in a canal.
As Page Two first reported in March, the nine were notified soon after the crash that they were under investigation for failing to recover Wilson, who drowned.
Only when the wrecker pulled out Wilson's Hyundai was his body discovered.
Goodman was charged with vehicular homicide and DUI manslaughter. Wilson's family is suing him.
County Attorney Denise Nieman declined to release the full report of the internal investigation, saying it is now part of a claims file.
Meanwhile, Cinilia, 51, an EMS captain, was issued a written warning two weeks ago for failure to perform his duty, according to employee records that the county did release.

More story: http://www.firerescue1.com/search-rescue/articles/904839-2-fire-captains-disciplined-in-Fla-victim-search/





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Women calls 911 from inside of car

Post by Rapid Diver on Sat Nov 06, 2010 8:09 pm

http://www.justnews.com/news/23778638/detail.html

Eva Rubino, 76, was driving her white Hyundai around 5 a.m. when she lost control and ended up in the canal located at the 10000 block of Northwest 29th Street.

Within seconds, she called 911 to report the crash.

•Rubino: "My car is in the water right off the Mullens Park old library. I can't open my door and I am sitting in the water in the car."

•911 Operator: "So you're inside the car?"

•Rubino: "I'm inside the car and I'm in the water. You just can't miss it. I'm sitting in the middle of it and the water is rising in the car. If you don't get to me soon, it will all be over."

MORE

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Diving Police Officer honored by Fire District 1

Post by Rapid Diver on Sun Dec 12, 2010 3:13 am





St. Tammany News

If somebody within Fire District 1 in and around Slidell gets into trouble in water, they can be reassured that firefighters will be able to rescue them, thanks to a member of the Slidell Police Department.

Thursday morning, Slidell police officer Mark Michaud was honored by the FD1 for training firefighters on a device called a Rapid Diving Vest. Michaud is no stranger to the underwater world. He’s been diving professionally and for pleasure for the past 11 years. The device is a vest that has an oxygen bottle attached to it, plus a regulator and mouthpiece. The vest can also be inflated for floatation. A rescuer has 10 minutes of oxygen, and it can be quickly donned for fast rescues.
Slidell police officer Mark Michaud, fourth from left, accepts a plaque from Fire District 1 Battalion Chief of Special Operations James Rhyce in gratitude of his training firefighters in the use of the Rapid Diving Vest to use for water rescues. From left is Slidell Assistant Police Chief Kevin Foltz; Fire District 1 Chief of Administration Chris Kaufmann, Slidell Police Chief Randy Smith, Michaud, Rhyce and Fire District 1 Chief Larry Hess. (Staff Photo by Erik Sanzenbach)


“It is used just for rescue and to keep the firefighter or police officer safe,” Michaud said.

For the past year, Michaud has been training FD1 firefighters with the device. The firefighters first go to Coral Reef Dive Shop where they learn the basics of scuba. Then Michaud takes over and gives them an intense eight hour lesson in how to use the vests correctly and safely.

Full story here

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In the news....Sink to your death: Agencies do little to ensure motorists escape sinking cars

Post by Rapid Diver on Wed Dec 22, 2010 3:24 pm

Sink to your death: Agencies do little to ensure motorists escape sinking cars

Story here:

http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2010/dec/11/florida-drown-car-canal-lake-fatal-Mary-Catania/

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Rapid Diver Entry System Operational Procedures for Beach Patrol Units

Post by Admin on Sat Feb 26, 2011 11:17 am

Below is a RDE SOP that was put together by Wyatt (Cocoa Beach FD)

Rapid Diver Entry System Operational Procedures


Application:


"Rapid Diver Entry System (RDES) was developed for a rapid extrication of a victim by allowing dive rescue teams to get in the water faster. It was designed for those situations when a quick underwater rescue can be performed. RES allows the first officer on scene to assess the situation, place the call for Fire Department Special Operations and initiate the location while Fire Rescue is in route. It saves valuable time and increases the chances of finding submerged victim(s) while they are still alive."

Rapid Entry System, however, is not intended for search and recovery operations unless combined with line search.


Minimum Requirements:


Dive Rescue Team candidates must successfully complete the following:

1. NASE Certified Open Water Scuba Diver
2. Rescue Diver training
3. Confined and open water training
4. Pass a performance test, which includes:

a) 1000 yard swim (crawl stroke only) with mask, fins and snorkel
b) 25 yard underwater swim with one single breath
c) 500 yard paddle wearing the RES equipment
d) 250 yard surface swim wearing the RES equipment
e) RES equipment donning time of 60 seconds or less.

In addition, each team member is required to swim in a pool using the RDES equipment to establish average air consumption rate in order to qualify for the Ocean Rescue Dive Rescue Team.

The team will be required to train at least once a month and to keep a log book to document all training. All Dive Team data will be kept on file at Ocean Rescue Headquarters, administered by the Dive Rescue Training Officer(s).




Training and skills development is conducted by a certified Specialty Instructor (can be staff member or from qualified outside source). The Dive Rescue Training Officer(s) will have the responsibility of maintaining instructor ratings in accordance with NASE or other professional organizations.


Note: Dive team candidates will be also carefully evaluated based on each individual's attitude, certification, and ability.


Safety Precautions:


Every dive requires the RDES Dive Team Member to take the following safety measures prior to RDES equipment use:

1. Perform a quick pre-dive equipment check before entering the water, including the following:
a) Minimum tank pressure 2000 PSI
b) Regulator is operating normally
c) Buoyancy compensator inflation/deflation ok
d) Proper weighting
e) Releases.

2. Depth gauge (Speed Tech depth meter)
3. Two cutting tools (a dive knife and a pair of shears)
4. A watch to monitor bottom time limit
5. A Back-up Officer at the surface at all times to assist Rescue Divers
6. Maximum dive depth of 25 feet, determined by “Speed Tech” depth-meter.
7. Maximum bottom time of 10 minutes;
8. Tank pressure 2000 PSI, minimum pressure of 500 PSI at the surface 9. Back up Oxygen tanks (one per each Rapid Diver Entry System in use).

Note: Equipment must be standardized to allow familiarization between all divers.


Emergency Procedures:


Ocean Rescue Dive Rescue Team will be operating in the Rescue Mode (the first hour after notification of a missing victim).The Incident Commander is the Officer In Charge (OIC).Upon notification of an emergency, the Incident Commander (OIC) will assign line search team(s) if a search needs to be conducted. The OIC or Designate will bring RDES Dive Rescue Team Members to the scene to operate in conjunction with line search. The OIC will select the Primary Diver at that time. RDES Dive Team Members will assist on scene evaluation including:


1. Witness interviews, more than one if possible
2. Placement of red flags or other reference points such as a throw bag with marker buoy to determine "last seen location"
3. Entry points.


Note: The OIC may use divers (Dive Rescue Team) as "technical advisors" to aid in decisions concerning the dive rescue operation. However, the OIC makes the final decision to allow or refuse dive rescue operations to enter the water based on Risk/Benefit Factor and his/her assessment of the scene. The Ocean Rescue Dive Rescue Team will only operate in the Rescue Mode. The potential benefit must be considered high to enter the water. All recovery operations will be turned over to Fire Rescue or Police Dive Teams.


The OIC may utilize a PWC Operator and crew member(s) to launch the Personnel Water Craft (PWC)-conditions, staffing and/or availability permitting. The PWC Operator will be communicating with OIC using a marine radio. When the Primary Diver is ready for the first dive, a back-up Ocean Rescue Officer will be on the surface. If not on the PWC, an officer will be on a paddleboard to provide assistance. The back-up should be, if available, the Safety Diver (a certified RDES Dive Rescue Team member). In the absence of a second diver, back-up person must have mask, fins and snorkel. Besides providing assistance, he/she will also gather information, monitor, communicate with the Primary Diver, and with an officer on the PWC and/or shoreline using hand signals. The Primary Diver will stop at predetermined tank pressure. The Safety Diver must be prepared to take over as soon as the first diver surfaces.

In case of multiple victims, both Primary and Safety divers should perform dives at the same time, as long as they have additional back-up at the surface as per Operating Emergency Procedures. Divers will use predetermined hand signals underwater to communicate.

Upon retrieval of submerged victim(s), diver(s) will make the transport to the surface. The fastest resource available should be used to transport patient(s) to the shore. Assessment of the patient(s) should start even before contact is made. Once on shore, basic life support must be provided until paramedics are on scene.

Note: At any point, the OIC can make plans to bring Unified Command (Fire Department) on scene. The OIC will remain the Incident Commander in the Rescue Mode. Once in the Recovery Mode (after the first hour of the Rescue Mode has expired), operations will continue under the Unified Command structure. Unified Command may determine status of rescue/recovery mode when “on scene” command is established.


Dive Rescue Team Responsibilities:


1. To follow safety procedures
2. To provide care and maintenance of the equipment by:
- Weekly inspection of all Rapid Diver Response Dive Apparatus, to be conducted and documented by a member of the Rapid Diver Response Dive Team.
- Reporting any parts that need to be replaced, repaired, or restored
- Making sure cylinders are stored with oxygen at 3000 PSI
- After each use, equipment must be rinsed thoroughly with fresh water and properly secured.
3. Report(s) of all dive incidents are to be documented on the Diver Accident Report, which is completed and submitted at the end of each incident
4. All RES Dive Team members must document all dives in the Diving Activity Resume log(s), to be kept on file at Ocean Rescue Headquarters.

Note: As with any scuba equipment, RES and cylinders must be inspected and tested annually by an equipment specialist to ensure optimum performance.



Definitions:

SCUBA - Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus

PSI - Pressure per Square Inch

RDES - Rapid Diver Entry System (Scuba unit designed for rapid underwater entries)

Bottom Time - Total dive time

Officer In Charge (OIC) - Senior supervisor on-duty

Primary Diver – Initial diver in the water

Safety Diver – Back-up diver to primary diver, observes initial diver, can become primary diver if multiple victims or second dive needed

Back-up Officer – On scene Ocean Rescue Officer, equipped with mask, snorkel, and fins

Regulator - Regulates air coming from a scuba tank

Rescue Mode - When there is a possibility to save a human life

Recovery Mode - When there is no goal of saving a life

Risk/Benefit Factor - Is a subjective evaluation of the merits of an operation

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Rescue professionals questioned about training after recent drowning

Post by Rapid Diver on Mon Jun 06, 2011 5:43 am

From KTVU.com:

For a community surrounded by water on all sides, the need for adequate water rescue training for emergency responders has become a top priority in Alameda after a suicidal man drowned Monday in front of police and firefighters.

In years past, the fire department had a comprehensive water rescue team, interim Fire Chief Michael D'Orazi said before the City Council tonight, a program that included shore-based and surface-based tactics.

But after several years of struggling to balance budgets and making sacrifices, D'Orazi said, the program deteriorated to a state that left firefighters unable to respond Monday, when Raymond Zack, 53, waded neck-deep into the frigid water at Crown Memorial Beach and remained there until he lost consciousness.

Fire department paramedics on the shore were not permitted to rescue Zack because they were not certified in water rescue, the department's acting deputy chief of operations Daren Olson said Tuesday.



More info

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International Association of Dive Rescue Professionals Conference Fort Lauderdale

Post by Admin on Fri Sep 30, 2011 10:14 am

Here are some pictures from the IADRS Conference:




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Rapd Diver demo on YouTube.com

Post by Admin on Mon Oct 03, 2011 4:08 am

This is video of the Rapid Diver.


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Rapid Diver being #1 for Helo deployment

Post by Admin on Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:00 am

Rapid Diver is #1 with Helo Divers








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Government Lease to Own now available for the Rapid Diver System

Post by Admin on Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:05 am

Is it difficult for you to find the funds to buy dive equipment for your team?

One of the best options available is to have your Department Lease to Own dive equipment.

Here is a link you should check out: LeaseExperts.com

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Training for maritime disasters as seen on CNN

Post by Admin on Sat Jan 28, 2012 1:36 am


Multiple agencies show CNN how they train for underwater disasters in light of the cruise ship disaster in Italy.


See Rapid Divers being deployed in Port of Long Beach during training exercise.

Follow this link:

Training for maritime disasters

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NAUI Rapid Diver Certification now available

Post by Rapid Diver on Thu Aug 23, 2012 8:29 am


Rapid Diver and Dive Rescue Operations I training available.

NAUI certification is available for the Rapid Diver. Dive Rescue Operations I is a Florida Bureau of Fire Standards and Training approved class. It is 40 hours. Rapid Diver training can be included in the Dive Rescue Ops I course.

Training can be conducted in Tampa or at your location.

PM me for additional information.

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Dive team uses underwater system to save truck driver

Post by Rapid Diver on Fri Sep 07, 2012 2:50 am

Link to video of rescue

A man who landed his semi-truck in the bottom of a canal in an accident Thursday morning is alive after being recued by two brave fire fighters.

The team of fire fighter-divers helped the man after he reportedly lost control, crossed the lanes of traffic headed west and crashed through a fence and into the canal.

Aaron Odum and Justin Beasley were the two brave firefighters who pulled the man to safety.

Getting the driver out wasn't easy, thankfully Beasley and the rest of the dive team had their new underwater communication system which helped them maneuver and communicate in the dark and murky waters.

Golden Gate fire dive instructor Brian Brauvais says he tried for years to find the right communications system.

"We tested out several systems and luckily through a federal grant we were able to get the money to purchase this system," Brauvais said.

It's a system that's only two months old, a system that helped save a driver many are calling lucky.

"This gentleman is extremely lucky to be alive from what they were saying was an air pocket in the vehicle, which is, unless you watch TV, extremely rare in real life that will ever happen," Brauvais said.

The driver, 39-year-old Rodriguez Eduardo Perez, was flown to Lee Memorial Hospital with serious injuries.

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Fire Fighters are also Scuba Certified

Post by Rapid Diver on Thu Jan 24, 2013 6:17 pm

From (video here):

Fire Fighters are Scuba certified

COLLIER COUNTY, Fla.- It took Golden Gate Fire Fighters about 30 minutes to get to the submerged car on Alligator Alley. They actually had to cut through a fence to get to the canal. When divers reached the water, it was almost impossible to see. Lieutenant Kevin Shoch said he heard there were alligators nearby, but didn't see any. He was the third diver into the water.

"Two divers that pulled the three victims, they were pretty much out of air after that. So another two of us went in and continued searching and when we were out of air, two more went in and searched the car. Not only the car but the surrounding area for any other possible victims," said Lieutenant Shoch.

The Golden Gate Fire Department has dive equipment on every truck and when responding to emergencies, each truck has a diver on it. The water rescue team acts quickly, as soon as they decide it's safe to get into the water, they move quickly and work. They conduct about two to three dives a month and have recovered half a dozen people.

To make a donation to help the Douglas family, a memorial fund has been set up at Suntrust Bank:

Douglas Family Memorial Fund

Account number: 157840900

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Fire Rescue East Show 2013

Post by Rapid Diver on Fri Feb 01, 2013 10:24 am



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Clemson University FD This is the way to roll with the Rapid Diver System!

Post by Rapid Diver on Tue Feb 05, 2013 3:24 am

Here are some pictures of how Clemson University FD deploys the Rapid Diver System.







The back up 80 cu ft tank is already pre-configured with a Backpad for immediate use when necessary. This is an excellent example of what every FD rescue dive team should be doing.


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Collier emergency crews train for water rescues

Post by Rapid Diver on Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:24 pm

Collier emergency crews train for water rescues Click to watch Video

COLLIER COUNTY -
One month after a mother and her two daughters died in a canal crash on Alligator Alley, Collier County emergency crews trained for water rescues to make sure they are ready to respond if something like that accident ever happens again.

The training scenario was that three people were trapped inside a car underwater in a lake.


The agencies involved included the Golden Gate and North Naples fire departments, the Collier County Sheriff's Office and Collier County EMS.

"They all work together they communicate and they cooperate," said North Naples Fire Battalion Chief John Reilly.

Within minutes, one victim was pulled out of the water and trauma alerted, a chopper showed up to airlift the patient to the hospital.

After one hour, the rescue mission turned into a recovery effort.

Rescue crews say it's not a matter of if, but when the next water accident will happen and they want to be prepared.


"When we finish training today, we all get together and say, ‘OK, what did we do good what did we do bad? What could we do better?'" Reilly said.

Crews say the biggest challenge is often the time it takes to get on scene - especially on the Alley.

It took Golden Gate Fire crews 18 minutes to get out to last month's accident there because the fire station is so far out.

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New diving equipment to be used in Long Island boating accidents

Post by Rapid Diver on Thu May 23, 2013 8:37 pm

New diving equipment to be used in Long Island boating accidents

Originally published: May 21, 2013 4:14 PM


From: http://longisland.news12.com/news/new-diving-equipment-to-be-used-in-long-island-boating-accidents-1.5308185



The board today agreed to accept Rapid Diver equipment for the constables to use in future accidents. (May 21, 2013)

OYSTER BAY - A woman whose daughter was killed in a boating accident has won her fight to help prevent future tragedies.

Joy Treanor's 11-year-old daughter Harlie was one of three kids who died last July 4 when a boat capsized in Cold Spring Harbor. Treanor says she was shocked to learn that the bay constables and the Coast Guard didn't have the right equipment when they arrived on scene.

"It's like a fireman showing up to your house with no hose," Treanor says. “What's the point of coming to rescue you if you don't have the equipment to rescue?"

Treanor and Christopher Briggs, president of the Bay Constable Benevolent Association, appealed to the Oyster Bay Town Board to ensure that bay constables have the right gear to respond to a water emergency, since they're usually the first to arrive on scene. The board today agreed to accept Rapid Diver equipment for the constables to use in future accidents.

Briggs raised the money to purchase the Rapid Diver units, which include air sources for both the rescuer and the victim. Of the 10 units, four will go to Oyster Bay, two will go to the South Shore and two will go to the North Shore.

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Collier County, Joint Dive Rescue Training Exercise

Post by Rapid Diver on Tue Jun 04, 2013 9:45 pm

Video of the Year: North Naples Fire Department, Golden Gate Fire Department

Collier County, Joint Dive Rescue Training Exercise


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Town Adds Diving Equipment, Training

Post by Rapid Diver on Mon Jul 01, 2013 6:40 am

From: http://huntington.patch.com/groups/police-and-fire/p/town-adds-diving-equipment-training                                              Huntington has formed an emergency dive team and added equipment designed to help rescue people during water emergencies. The town received two of the systems, each valued at $3,000, from the Bay Constable Benevolent Association, which also provided the training.  Senior Harbormaster Harry Acker and four Town bay constables received training this week. Four more bay constables will receive training in the future to form a nine-member team.

Among the advantages of the Rapid Diver Entry Systems are that it can be stored in a small space, put on quickly and worn in situations in which conventional scuba gear is too cumbersome or restrictive. The Rapid Diver system stores in a pouch and can be ready for use in less than a minute.
   “This equipment will be especially useful in situations where quick extrication will save lives,” Supervisor Frank Petrone said. “We thank the Bay Constable Benevolent Association for donating the equipment and for training Town personnel in how to use it.”  Under the protocols adopted to reflect the addition of the Rapid Diver equipment, the Northport Fire Department, which is the only department in the area with an active dive team and a boat, will be notified immediately to either back up the Emergency Response Dive Team or to take over, using full scuba gear, if lengthier rescue operations are necessary.   “While we hope that accidents never happen, it is important that the Town has the proper equipment, the proper training and the proper protocols to assist victims trapped underwater quickly and safely,” Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. “This equipment and the training that goes along with it help us achieve those goals.”

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Re: Rapid Diver used for First Responders Fire/Rescue

Post by Rapid Diver on Thu Apr 17, 2014 3:26 pm

Discovery Channel showcased the Rapid Diver System.  Here is the link:



Last edited by Rapid Diver on Sun Nov 23, 2014 9:21 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Rapid Diver used for First Responders Fire/Rescue

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